Make your putting great again!

February 20, 2018

 As you may have seen from previous social media posts I have recently purchased a Blast Motion sensor. The Blast Sensor is designed to give specific metrics for not only putting but for all swings. I will mainly be using it to help players understand what is happening in their putting stroke and how this maybe effecting their performance. The sensor allows me to record the following metrics: 

 

  • Back Stroke Time

  • Forward Stroke Time

  • Total Stroke Time

  • Tempo

  • Impact Stroke Speed

  • Back Stroke Length

  • Back Stroke Rotation

  • Forward Stroke Rotation

  • Rotation Change

  • Lie Change

  • Loft Change

Below I have explained all the metrics and why they are important, the goal shows you the requirements to have an efficient stroke. If you wish to learn more and try the Blast Motion Sensor email me for bookings at: roryyoung.pga@gmail.com or call +97339215224

 

 

Your putting metrics explained:

 

What is Back Stroke Time?

 

Back Stroke Time is the elapsed time it takes to complete a Back Stroke (i.e., address to top of back stroke).

 

Why is back stroke time important?

 

Developing a consistent backstroke time is the easiest and quickest way to creating an overall better putting stroke. A consistent backstroke time will also help to set up a repeatable forward stroke time. Which will make it easier to create the proper speed to judge the putt.

 

What should Back Stroke Time be?

 

Goal: Back Stroke Time should be approximately 0.60 seconds, or twice as long as Forward Stroke Time, regardless of the length of the putt. Tempo ratio should remain consistent and be approximately 2.0:1.

 

Pro Average
0.60 seconds

 

Amateur Average
0.40 to 0.80 seconds

 

What is Forward Stroke Time?

 

Forward Stroke Time is the elapsed time it takes to complete a forward stroke (i.e., top of Back Stroke to impact).

 

Why is Forward Stroke Time important?

 

The forward stroke time is really a result of what has been set in the back stroke. If the back stroke is too fast or too slow it will have a negative effect on the forward stroke. If the forward stroke by result is then too slow, we know this to be a deceleration and the ball will come short, if too fast the ball will go racing forward. Matching the forward stroke time to your back stroke time

 

What should Forward Stroke Time be?

 

Goal: Ideal Forward Stroke Time should be approximately 0.30 seconds, or half as long as Back Stroke Time, regardless of the length of the putt.  Tempo ratio should be approximately 2.0:1.

 

Pro Average
0.30 seconds

 

Amateur Average
0.25 to 0.40 seconds

 

What is Total Stroke Time?

 

Total Stroke Time is the elapsed time it takes to make a complete putting stroke from the start of the stroke to impact with the ball.

 

Why is total stroke time important?

 

The total stroke time regardless of practice stroke or actual stroke should remain consistent regardless of putt or situation.

 

What should Total Stroke Time be?

 

Goal: Total Stroke Time will be approximately 0.90 seconds, regardless of the length of the putt.  Tempo ratio should be approximately 2.0:1.

 

Pro Average
0.90 seconds

 

Amateur Average
0.80 to 1.10 seconds

 

What is Tempo?

 

Tempo is the ratio between Back Stroke Time and Forward Stroke Time.

 

Why is Tempo important?

 

Your tempo is a reflection of how efficient your putting stroke is. To be efficient like the best in the world we are looking for a tempo that is 2:1. The body has an inherent lengthing and shortening pattern.

 

What should Tempo be?

 

Goal: Ideal Tempo is 2.0:1

 

Pro Average
1.8:1 to 2.1:1

 

Amateur Average
1.5:1 to 2.5:1

 

Metric Tip
Tempo should be 2.0:1 (Back Stroke Time : Forward Stroke Time)

  1. If Tempo is less than 2.0:1, check Back Stroke Time and Total Stroke Time.

  2. If Tempo is greater than 2.0:1, check Forward Stroke Time and Total Stroke Time.

What is Impact Stroke Speed?

 

Impact Stroke Speed is the speed of the sweet spot of the putter face at the moment of impact, and is measured in Miles Per Hour. Dialing in your ideal Stroke Speed on all putts will help you create predictable Ball Speed and eliminate 3 putts.

 

Why is Impact Stroke Speed important?

 

The average golfer today 3 putts 30% of the greens they play, mostly because they do not create the correct Stroke Speed for each putt. Sometimes the stroke is too fast and the ball goes screaming by the hole, sometimes it’s too slow and the ball doesn’t get to the hole.

 

On putts of the same distance, incorrect Stroke Speeds are caused by inconsistent Stroke Timing, and improper Stroke Length. This makes it very difficult to create a consistent stroke, and get your ball rolling to the hole with the correct speed.

 

Think of repeating Stroke Timing on every putt as step one, adjusting Back Stroke Length as step 2, and Stroke Speed will become much more predictable.

 

What should Impact Stroke Speed be?

 

The goal of Impact Stroke Speed it to create the appropriate ball speed for precise distance control.

 

The ideal Stroke Speed will depend on a few conditions…the stimp of the green, the slope of the green, and the distance of the putt.

 

For example: On a flat or almost zero degree slope, on a 3 foot putt, an ideal Impact Stroke Speed is around 1.5 MPH, a 6-foot putt requires a Stroke Speed of around 2.0 MPH, and a 12-foot putt requires a Stroke Speed of around 3.0 MPH.

 

These are great baseline numbers to strive for, but will have to be adjusted if putting on different slopes and different stimp greens. You will need a faster Stroke Speed on slower stimp greens or putting on uphill slopes, and you will need a slower Stroke Speed on faster stimp greens or putting on downhill slopes.

 

Putts from the same location should have the same Impact Stroke Speed, repeated to within approximately 0.2 MPH.

 

What is Back Stroke Length?

 

Back Stroke Length is the length the putter face travels in the Back Stroke from address to the top of the Back Stroke. Back Stroke Length is measured in inches and is one of the 3 main elements of distance control, along with Stroke Timing and Stroke Speed. A best practice for this metric is to ensure the putter face is close to the back of the golf ball at address before starting your stroke.

Think of the Blast sensor as a ruler for your putting stroke.

 

Why is Back Stroke Length important?

 

Back Stroke Length is important because it is a major factor in hitting a putt the correct distance. Most golfers struggle with distance control because their Back Stroke Length changes on putts of the same distance, and so does their Back and Forward Stroke Timing. This makes it very difficult to create a consistent stroke, and get your ball rolling the correct speed to the hole. Think of repeating Stroke Timing on every putt as step one, adjusting Back Stroke Length as step 2.

 

What should Back Stroke Length be?

 

The goal of Back Stroke Length is to make an appropriate sized stroke to hit the ball the correct distance.

 

Your Back Stroke Length will depend on a conditions… the stimp of the green, the slope of the green, and the distance of putt. On a flat portion of a medium stimp green, on a 3-foot putt, a good Back Stroke Length goal is approximately 4.5 inches. On a 6-foot putt, Back Stroke Length should be approximately 6 inches, and a 12-foot putt should be about 8.5 inches. These are great baseline numbers to strive for, but will have to be adjusted base on the green conditions. Make a longer Back Stroke if putting uphill or on a slower stimp green, and shorter Back Stroke if putting downhill or on a faster stimp green.

Putts from the same location should have the same Back Stroke Length repeated to within 1 inch.

 

What is Back Stroke Rotation?

 

Back Stroke Rotation is the rotation of the putter face during the Back Stroke, measured in degrees.

 

Why is Back Stroke Rotation important?

 

Back stroke rotation sets the tone for the amount of forward stroke rotation. Most amateurs tend to take too long a back stroke with too much rotation on a large arc. Doing this it will lead you to need a lot of manipulation to get the ball roll end over end, towards the hole.

 

To make a good stroke we need to limit the amount of back stroke rotation

 

What should Back Stroke Rotation be?

 

Goal: Ideal Back Stroke Rotation should equal Forward Stroke Rotation

 

Pro Average
Equal to Forward Stroke Rotation +- 0.0-0.5* open or closed

 

Amateur Average
Equal to Forward Stroke Rotation – 0.0-1.0* open or closed

 

What is Forward Stroke Rotation?

 

Forward Stroke Rotation is the rotation of the putter face during the Forward Stroke, measured in degrees.

 

Why is Forward Stroke Rotation important?

 

The amount of forward stroke rotation is set by the amount of back stroke rotation. Too much forward stroke rotation will lead you to starting the ball left of your intended line, whilst too little will start the ball to the right.

 

To create a consistent and effective putting stroke the back stroke rotation and forward stroke rotation should match.

 

What should Forward Stroke Rotation be?

 

Goal: Ideal Forward Stroke Rotation will be equal to Back Stroke Rotation

 

Pro Average
Equal to Back Stroke Rotation +- 0.0-0.5* open or closed

 

Amateur Average
Equal to Back Stroke Rotation  – 0.0-1.0* open or closed

 

What is Rotation Change?

 

Rotation Change is the difference in Rotation (the rotation of the putter face around the shaft) between the start of the stroke and impact with the ball, measured in degrees.

 

Rotation Change (open) means the putter face was not rotated enough on the Forward Stroke to return to its original starting alignment. Rotation Change (closed) means the putter face rotated past its original starting alignment. Assuming the initial aim of the putter face is directly at the center of the target, Rotation Change of 0.0* is ideal.

 

Why is Rotation Change important?

 

Rotation change is the calculation between back stroke and forward stroke rotation.

 

What should Rotation Change be?

 

Goal: Ideal Rotation Change will be 0* open or closed

 

Pro Average
0-0.5* open or closed

 

Amateur Average
0.0-1.0* open or closed

 

Metric Tip
If the face origin of the putter is aligned at the target at address, Rotation Change should be 0.0*.

  1. Confirm that the face origin of the putter is perfectly aligned at the target at address.  (It is best to find a straight putt and/or use a laser, an elastic string, or a chalk line.)

  2. Back Rotation and Forward Rotation should be equal numbers. (i.e., If Back Rotation is 4*, then Forward Rotation should also be 4*.)

  3. Address the putter as close to the ball as possible

 

What is Lie?

 

Lie is the increase or decrease in Lie (the angle between the club shaft and the ground) between the start of a stroke and impact with the ball, measured in degrees.

 

Assuming the putter face is flush with the ground at the start of a stroke, lifting your hands will increase Lie, spinning the ball away from you. Lowering your hands will decrease Lie, spinning the ball towards you. In a biomechanically efficient putting stroke, there should not be an increase or decrease in Lie.

 

Why is Lie important?

 

With putter design they are created so that when the sole of the putter

lays flat to the ground, the sweet spot will point the sweet sport directly to the target. An increase in the lie throughout the swing will have the sweet spot aiming to the right whilst a decrease in lie will have the sweet spot aiming left. For optimal condition we want to ensure that the putter remains flush to the ground throughout impact.

 

What should Lie be?

 

Goal: Ideal Lie will be 0* increased or decreased

 

Pro Average
0 to 0.5* increased or decreased

 

Amateur Average
0.0 to 1.0* increased or decreased

 

Metric Tip
If the sole of the putter is parallel with the ground at address, Lie Change should be 0.0*.

  1. Make sure that the sole of the putter is flush with the ground at address and impact.

  2. Maintain body posture throughout the entire stroke.  One common cause of Lie Change is poor postural stability, which allows the upper body to raise or lower during the stroke.

 

What is Loft?

 

Loft is the increase or decrease in Loft (the angle of the putter face relative to the vertical plane) between the start of the stroke and impact with the ball, measured in degrees.

 

Assuming the putter face is flush with the ground during the start of a stroke, pushing your hands towards the hole will decrease Loft and drive the ball into the ground. Pulling your hands away from the hole will increase Loft and send the ball into the air. In a biomechanically efficient putting stroke, there should not be an increase or decrease in

Loft.

 

Why is Loft important?

 

Loft plays a major part in ball performance, when we decrease loft the ball will be driven into the floor whilst if we increase the loft the ball will be launched up. Both decreasing and increasing loft will have a negative impact on ball performance in regards to ball speed, ball launch and roll. We want to aim for no change in loft throughout the stroke.

 

What should Loft be?

 

Goal: Ideal Loft will be 0* increased or decreased

 

Pro Average
0 to 0.5* increased or decreased

 

Amateur Average
0.0 to 1.0* increased or decreased

 

Metric Tip
If the sole of the putter is parallel with the ground at address, Loft Change should be 0.0*.

  1. Make sure that the sole of the putter is parallel with the ground at address and impact.

  2. Maintain consistent ball position on every putt.

  3. Avoid pressing your hands towards or away from the target at address and as you are about to hit the ball.

  4. Address the putter as close to the ball as possible.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

 

 

 

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